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LAUNCESTON 17—19 FEBRUARY 2023MONA
FOMAnipaluna / HOBART 24—26 FEBRUARY 2023

Fantastic Futures

Fantastic Futures. A motif of Team building and trust exercises.

Head into the decommissioned shell of the old Launceston Tafe—a place that once promised ‘Fantastic Futures’—for an exhibition of genuine and manufactured 'coming-togetherness'. Entry is free, but you’ll still need to register for a free ticket as part of the Old Tafe Sessions. Select a day below.

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Friday 17–Sunday 19 February, 1–7pm

Accessibility Information

Physical access

The Paterson Street entrance is level. The Wellington Street entrance is accessible via a ramp, but it does have a narrow point (1m). There are lifts within the building. Accessible viewing platforms will be available, contact the Bookings & Enquiries team by emailing tickets@mona.net.au or calling +61 (3) 6277 9978.

Accessible parking nearby

Accessible parking at Paterson Street West (79–83 Paterson Street) with seven accessible spaces, lift and accessible toilet (cubicle open 24 / 7). This carpark is 150m from the venue.

Accessible toilets

There are 2 accessible toilets total on site—one in B block ground floor, and one in A block ground floor. See Mona Foma staff if you're having trouble finding them.

Quiet spaces/break out rooms for sensory relief

Block A, Room A1-04 (ground floor). Follow the signs; see Mona Foma staff if you need help finding it.

  • Olho da Rua (Out Loud), (video still), 2022, Jonathas de Andrade.

    Olho da Rua (Out Loud)

    Jonathas de Andrade

    1–7pm

    Jonathas collaborates with a vast cast of homeless residents from the Brazilian city of Recife to create this work, turning the observed to the observer. What do these people see when they look into the camera, or the mirror? And what do we see when we look back, be it on the streets, or a screen?

    Credits

    Curated by Emma Pike

  • Breakfast in Bed (video still), 2016, Kenneth Tam

    Breakfast in Bed

    Kenneth Tam

    1–7pm

    Kenneth worked with seven men he recruited through online postings (like Craigslist) to participate in a mock men's social club. The result is part social experiment, part absurdist theatre.

    Credits

    Curated by Emma Pike

  • Anthem Anthem

    Photo: Peter Mathew

    Anthem Anthem Revolution

    Terrapin

    1–7pm

    Local children pour their hopes and dreams for the country into a new national anthem, helped by pakana hip-hop artist DENNI, composer Thomas Rimes, multidisciplinary artist Dylan Sheridan and the TSO. Want to hear it? You’ll have to beat a robot at table tennis.

    Credits

    Director: Sam Routledge

    Youth Facilitators: Alex Walker, Davina Wright

    System Designer and Beats Programming: Dylan Sheridan

    Songwriter, Lyrics & Vocals: Denni Proctor

    Songwriter, Composer & Conductor: Thomas Rimes

    Visual Direction & Set Design: Michelle Boyde

    Audiovisual & Graphic Design: Futago

    Recording Partner: Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra

    Baritone: Samuel Dundas

    Workshop Assistant: Billie Rankin

    Youth Participants: Beatrix Bailey, Dottie Charlton, Frieda Cupit Sumner, Neo (Mika) Cupit Sumner, Annabelle Fenton, Quinn Sidney Gardner (Quince), Alondra Lisica, Pearl Smithies, Declan Triffitt, Isabella Triffitt, Woolf Wattern Wakelam, Dani Wright

    Production Manager: Ryan Mahony

    Curated by Emma Pike

  • Queer Woodchopping

    The Queer Woodchop

    Pony Express

    5.15-6.45pm

    In an unlikely (or likely?) collaboration, the classic country-show woodchopping competition meets joyous queer festivity in an interactive spectacle of flying wood and fabulousness.

    Credits

    Curated by Emma Pike

    Showrunners: Ian Sinclair and Loren Kronemyer

    LX and SX: Hosting

    Wrangler: Sophie Ambler 

    Scenography: Marcus Tatton

    Design: Rachael Guinness 

    Choppers: HK Vermeulen, Solomon Frank

    Announcers: Rob Braslin, Rose Kingdom-Barron 

    This project has been assisted by:

    The Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body

    Arts Tasmania

     Art Farm Birchs Bay

  • Christmas Birrimbirr

    Manapanmirr, in Christmas Spirit

    Miyarrka Media

    1–7pm

    Missionaries introduced Christmas stories and rituals to small bush settlements across East Arnhem Land during the 1930s and 40s. Yolŋu families embraced this new annual event with a particular talent for ceremony, beginning in late October, when the first thunderclouds of the wet season begin to rumble and families across Arnhem Land begin their Christmas preparations.

    Manapanmirr, in Christmas Spirit is a performative documentary made to affirm—and share—this Yolngu take on Christmas. Co-director, the late Fiona Yaŋathu, described the work as a 'gift of grief' from her family to the world.

    Credits

    Curated by Emma Pike

  • Interbeing (video still), 2018, Martina Hoogland Ivanow

    Interbeing

    Martina Hoogland Ivanow

    1–7pm

    Shot entirely with thermal cameras, this film renders—in slightly eerie black-and-white—bodies, human interactions, and the lingering heat they leave behind.

    Credits

    Curated by Emma Pike

  • Song of the sea witch

    Song of the Sea Witch, 2020, (video still), Marnie Weber

    Song of the Sea Witch

    Marnie Weber

    1–7pm

    In a realm somewhere between fantasy, reality, and a filmed trip to the beach, punk musician Marnie Weber plays a witch whose seaside solitude is disturbed by a group of migratory birds.

    Credits

    Curated by Emma Pike

  • Border Farce, 2022, (video still), Safdar Ahmed

    Border Farce

    Safdar Ahmed

    1–5pm

    Kurdish-Iranian heavy metal guitarist Kazem Kazemi spent six years detained in Australia’s offshore prison camp on Manus island. This video features footage and sound from his collaborations and heavy metal performances, which he thinks of as ‘a kind of medicine’ for the experience of detention and abandonment.

    Credits

    Curated by Emma Pike

  • Chant

    Lick Lick Blink, 2019 (film still), Willoh S.Weiland and Sandi Sissel, Commissioned by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney

    CHANT

    Willoh S. Weiland

    1–5pm

    Willoh collaborated with women’s sporting clubs to choreograph and perform historic and contemporary feminist protest chants, creating visibility (and maybe a template) for local engagement with international issues.

    Credits

    Commissioned by MONA FOMA. Supported by Contemporary Art Tasmania with funding from Arts Tasmania

    Curated by Emma Pike

  • Prayer - James Webb

    Photo: Prayer, 2012, James Webb. Photo: Anthea Pokroy

    Prayer

    James Webb

    1–7pm

    Recordings of prayer, song, and vocal worship, gathered from all over the state. Prostrate yourself, and listen.

  • Complaints Choir

    Complaints Choir

    Tellervo Kalleinen + Oliver Kochta-Kalleinen

    5–5.15pm

    It’s a choir that sings complaints. Your complaints. About Launceston. Nothing like some grievances aired and shared to bring people together, right?

    Live in Launceston? Got a complaint? Submit it here.

    Credits

    Curated by Emma Pike

  • The Director

    Photo: Bryony Jackson

    The Director

    APHIDS

    3–4.30pm

    This performance requires an additional ticket to attend. Tickets here
    A theatre show among the art: an ex-funeral director and a theatre director walk into a room. Watch them stumble along the fine line between the macabre, playful and tragic as they explore death and the industry that surrounds it. (90min)

    Credits

    Lead artist: Lara Thoms

    Co-creator: Scott Turnbull

    Design: Katie Sfetkidis

    Dramaturgs: Aaron Orzech and Lz Dunn

    Sound: Kenneth Pennington

    Producer: Anna Nalpantidis

    Originally presented by ARTSHOUSE as part of Culturelab, Supported by The Australia Council for the Arts and Creative Victoria

    Curated by Emma Pike

  • Hyperbolic Psychedelic

    Hyperbolic Psychedelic Mind Melting Tunnel of Light

    Robin Fox

    1–7pm

    An ‘extreme time and space bending experience’ designed for one person at a time. Your hands are on the controls: light, sound, motion (but hopefully not too much mind-melting).

    This work involves strobe lighting effects. Still suitable for kids, though